Women’s health equity

We are pushing for greater equity in women’s health, from access, to treatments, to outcomes. We encourage and support high quality research that uses a gender sensitive approach and advocate for policies that acknowledge the importance of gender sensitive, evidence-based research.

Our projects are working to improve women's health around the world.

Our projects are working to improve women's health around the world.

Our projects are working to improve women's health around the world.

Our projects are working to improve women's health around the world.

The George Institute for Global Health is building the evidence base, influencing policy through driving discussion and debate, and collaborating with leading institutions globally to improve health outcomes for women around the world.

Our push for women’s health equity focuses on non-communicable diseases and injury—the leading causes of death and disability for women worldwide—building on the growing body of evidence that demonstrates men and women around the world experience differences in health access, treatment and outcomes. Improving the health of women worldwide requires an agenda that acknowledges the leading causes of death and disability for women and considers women’s health throughout all stages of life from adolescence to ageing.

Our approach

Our goal is to push for greater equity in women’s health, from access, to treatments, to outcomes. We encourage and support high quality research that uses a gender sensitive approach and advocate for policies that acknowledge the importance of gender sensitive, evidence-based research.

Why Women’s Health equity?

The global burden of disease has changed significantly in the last 20 years. The leading causes of death and disability for women in almost all countries in the world are now non-communicable diseases and injury. Research and policy has not kept up with these changes.

What are the policy issues?

  • Inconsistent approaches to collecting and using sex and gender in health research
  • Variations in men and women’s ability to access care
  • Variations in how men and women experience disease and treatment
  • Variations in health outcomes of men and women with the same disease

Framing Women’s Health Policy around the World

In 2016 we published an Oxford Martin Policy Paper, Women’s Health: A New Global Agenda. This paper provides a framework for prioritising and designing policy and makes recommendations for next steps to improve our research and increase our knowledge that will improve women’s health and health equity.  

Read our policy paper ‘Women’s health: A Global Agenda’

In May 2016, The George Institute for Global Health India, put out a Policy Report on Framing Women’s Health Issues in 21st Century India. The current status of women’s health in India were discussed, as well as challenges, goals and recommendations for how to move toward greater equity for women in India. 

Read our policy paper Framing Women’s Health Issues in 21st Century India 

In August 2017, The George Institute for Global Health China hosted a Roundtable Discussion of Women’s through Life Course and Empowerment and published a report on priorities, strategies and recommendations for promoting women’s health issues in China.

Read the report on Women's Health through Life Course and Empowerment in China

Sex and gender in health

We are pushing for a sex and gendered approach to the collection and utilisation of health data, whether in routinely-collected health statistics or in the creation of new scientific knowledge so we can improve our knowledge about disease occurrence and outcomes – for both men and women.

In May 2018, The George Institute (in collaboration with the Bupa Foundation) hosted a stakeholder forum on ensuring the collection, analysis and reporting of sex- and gender-specific health data in Australia.

More on events and collaborations

"At The George Institute, we believe that ones’ health and life expectancy shouldn’t be determined by geography, socioeconomic status, fate – or gender."

Professor Robyn Norton, "Urging a New Global Agenda for Women’s Health"